Choosing the Right Pet Bird Breed for Your Life - BrianaDragon Creations

Choosing the Right Pet Bird Breed for Your Life

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Lovebird Animal - Image: Public Domain, Pixabay
Posted by / July 29, 2014 / 0 Comments

What kind of bird is the best fit for your life?

If you want a bird as a pet, it’s a good idea to learn a bit about different types of birds, and take some time to decide which one is the best fit for your life.

There are so many different kinds of birds that you can have as pets, it may be hard to choose which kind you want. A lot of people go for the common choices of a parakeet or cockatiel, but there are a lot of other options. Having owned several types of birds myself, and being a member of one of the internet’s largest bird owner communities, I thought I’d share some tips on how to choose the right bird to be your feathered friend.

One of the first things you need to think about is the size of your home. If you have a small home, you probably want a small bird (like a finch or parakeet). If you have a big home with large rooms, you have the option of choosing a larger bird (as large as a cockatoo or macaw.). Your housing situation is also important due to the fact that birds can be noisy. The bigger the bird, the bigger the noise, and if you live in an apartment complex, your neighbors might not appreciate a squawking bird in the next-door unit.

If you have a home big enough to have a large bird, you need to decide if you actually want one. Bigger birds require more care, they make bigger messes, and they’re capable of causing greater injury to their owners. A big bird can be a great pet, but you have to be willing to deal with all that goes into taking care of them. It’s also worth noting that a larger bird will not be able to live caged all the time, so you need to make sure you have the space and desire to have the bird loose in your home.

Next you need to decide if you want a bird that can live constantly caged, or if you can handle a bird that will be out of its cage. Small birds like finches, canaries and parakeets can be happy living in their cage all the time. Parakeets can be let out, but birds smaller than that usually do best in a cage. Most medium and large sized birds need to be let out of their cages on a regular basis so they can move around and have space to exercise and play. Some people will keep larger birds constantly caged, but it’s actually quite cruel.

Another factor to consider is how many birds you want. A lot of birds can be perfectly happy alone, as long as they get enough attention from their owners, but some birds require the company of their own kind. Finches are community birds, meaning they need a flock to be happy. Lovebirds are another example of a bird that needs the company of its own kind. Some people have single lovebirds, but they don’t often fare well without a partner, as they mate for life.

You may also want to keep in mind the lifespan of a bird. Smaller birds like parakeets have an average lifespan of 10-12 years under proper care. Cockatiels can live 20-25 years, African Greys can live 50-60 years and macaws can live upwards of 75 years. The bigger the bird the longer the commitment. I have actually heard of people writing their birds into their will to ensure that they are cared for after the death of the owner.

Money is also a consideration when choosing a bird. The larger the bird, the more it will cost to feed and care for it. You’ll need to buy your supplies before you buy the bird, and large cages and toys can cost a lot of money. Also, the bigger the bird, the more the bird itself will cost. My Lutino cockatiel, Stoli, cost $120, and I’ve seen birds range into the thousands of dollars. You’ll also need to consider the cost of an avian vet. Most regular vets don’t know how to care for birds, so you need to find a vet that specializes in bird care.

Now that you have all of these things in mind, it should be easier to choose the type of bird that will fit best into your life. There are other factors that go into deciding, but these are some of the top ones. Go online and look at small, medium and large size birds, then think about this list. Hopefully you’ll be able to pick a bird that will be the perfect fit for your home and family.

About Briana Blair

Artist, writer, ordained interfaith minister, Dr. of Metaphysics and passionate oddball. I love to create, and I love bringing knowledge and joy to others. I've been an artist for 35 years, a writer for 26 and a Pagan for 22. And I'm just getting started!
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